Tag: youth risk behavior

To D.I.Y. or not to D.I.Y….

We are long past the days when “Do It Yourself” or “DIY” described college students creating projects on a dime.  These days DIY is mainstream.  On a whole, the DIY philosophy is laudable.  It represents problem solving, independence, thrift, and creativity.   However, there are times when DIY should be “DDIY” (Don’t Do It Yourself!)

Adolescent risk assessment is just such a case – whether it’s developing a screening tool completely from scratch – or creating an assessment that has just the “right” risk questions from existing screeners.  There are actually a LOT of evidence-based, scientific reasons why adolescent risk screeners should not be a homegrown DIY.

Here are just 3 of the top reasons why Adolescent Risk Screening is a DIY Don’t:

  1. Risk assessment is about much more than just the questions. Many organizations who have created in-house screeners focus extensively on the questions to be included in the assessment. In youth risk reduction, questions are only the beginning. In fact – in the CDC framework for risk assessment development, only two of the ten recommendations (20%) focus on the questions themselves.
  2. Tailoring is critical. From an assessment that is tailored to literacy, culture and age – to the delivery of tailored, action-oriented, information – the CDC framework emphasizes the importance of tailoring in efficacy of risk identification and reduction.
  3. A risk screener must be evaluated for validity and reliability. In order for an assessment to be considered valid it must meet content, construct and criterion-related validity.  In addition – it should be reliable (give the same results, with the same types of people, consistently).

To learn more about the differences between DIY tools and a validated, standardized assessment (and why those differences really matter), please check out our newest resource:

The Science of Youth Risk Assessment

DOWNLOAD NOW

The Top 5 Worst Reasons Why…

We help providers, professionals, and parents, identify and reduce risk behaviors among youth and young adults. So you might imagine that in our line of work that we’ve “heard it all.”

And yes, we’ve heard a lot, but it’s not the stories and information that young people share that shocks us. It’s what we hear from youth-centric organizations (provider groups, schools, health departments…) about why they don’t screen for risk behaviors that we find flat out scary.

Here are the top 5 worst reasons we’ve heard…so far.

1. If we know about a risk we’ll be responsible to take action. At it’s core, we believe that this reason isn’t just about liability – it’s about the fear of what happens if something goes wrong. Think past that initial reaction – and it becomes obvious that we’d all feel equally terrible (and potentially, even as liable) if something goes wrong (such as an overdose, a suicide attempt, unreported abuse or bullying…) and we didn’t know about it in advance. No one is expecting you to be the expert at every risk or situation. Identifying risks in advance allows youth to “get it off their chest” and you to provide resources and when necessary referrals to the right experts who can help to prevent bad things from getting worse – or maybe even from happening at all.

2. We don’t have the time. It’s true, you always need more time. Our company was founded by a clinician with years of experience in busy pediatric and adolescent practices. Finding practical solutions that minimize impact on time and workflow is at the heart of everything we do. Did you know that in less than 5 minutes RAAPS identifies the risks that contribute most to preventable illness and death in young people aged 9 to 24? Even in the tightest of workflows in organizations that run like clockwork you’ll find a 5-minute window of wait time for the patient – why not put that time to (really meaningful) use?

3. We don’t have the money. You’ve heard that expression: “If it’s important you’ll find a way. If it’s not you’ll find an excuse.” To be fair, we think this reason is more about priorities than excuses. There are so many competing priorities for organizations that serve youth it’s hard for anything new to find it’s way to the top of the list. Think about the things that do get prioritized: vaccines; assessments of height, weight and blood pressure; current medications and allergies… Why do these things sift to the top? They save lives. Now think about this CDC statistic: risk behaviors are responsible for 3 out of 4 (75%) of all preventable deaths and illness in youth. Risk screening saves lives. And the cost? One month of access to the RAAPS system costs the same as a single case of coffee pods or printing paper. Really, we think it’s all about the priorities.

4. We don’t want to upset parents. That’s cool. Honestly, neither do we, but realistically how upset do you think parents will be if there is an uptick in bullying, an increase in youth carrying weapons, or a widespread incidence of sexual abuse that could have been identified with standardized screening? As providers of risk identification and reduction tools we have time-tested, proven strategies and resources for helping parents understand risk screening – why it’s important and how it helps. And trust us, that’s an easier conversation to have proactively than reactively.

5. We don’t know what to say. There’s no doubt: conversations about risk are uncomfortable. But did you know that having a trusted adult to confide in is one of the single most important mitigating factors in reducing youth risk? Just by being present and starting the conversation you’ve helped. So take the next step. If you are uncomfortable with discussing certain topics – get help. Participate in a workshop on adolescent-focused motivational interviewing; choose a risk screening system that offers built in health education so all youth get the same information (every time); and make sure that system provides you with evidence-based messages and talking points to help get the conversation started. Because let’s be real – saving a life significantly outweighs one uncomfortable conversation.

Sex Ed 101: Here’s what we’ve learned so far…

The last year and a half has been very eventful here at P4C – we launched RAAPS 2.0 with a complete platform upgrade…  AND we released our first new product since our company was founded: the Adolescent Counseling Technology or “ACT” for Sexual Health (and our release of ACT for Tobacco is just around the corner).

With over a year of youth completing ACT for Sexual Health – we took a moment to analyze the data and reflect on what we’ve learned so far.  We were shaken at some of the findings and wanted to share them with you!

Our first ‘schooling’ came in the data.  We expected higher rates of risk among sexually active youth – but the levels are honestly staggering (and disquieting).

Among sexually active youth who were assessed and counseled by the ACT for Sexual Health system:

  • 19% have been in an abusive relationship in the last 12 months and 16% report being forced to participate in unwanted sexual activity
  • Nearly 1 in 4 (23%) had a partner who refused to use condoms or prevented the youth from using birth control
  • And 16% of youth report having bartered sex (for a place to stay, phone, alcohol or drugs, money or something else) – this number was much higher than any of us involved in the research and development of ACT had anticipated – and a growing trend that should be on the radar of all providers and professionals working with youth.

Schooling number two?  ACT solves different problems depending on the setting. We reached out to the providers and professionals using ACT – ranging from experienced sexual health gurus to novices and newbies.  We were interested in finding out the different ways organizations are using ACT SH to solve their problems related to engaging youth and supporting them in healthy decision making:

  • SBHCs are using ACT to open the door to more in-depth, in-person dialogue and counseling with sexually active youth and they are using the population-level data for reporting and to guide programming
  • Primary care and pediatric practices are using the electronic counseling to ensure sexually active youth are provided evidence-based, standardized education (a challenge in time-crunched practices where providers often have varying levels of experience and comfort levels with sex-related risk topics)
  • Health Departments are leveraging the technology to provide STI counseling and follow-up on a sustainable scale that wasn’t previously possible with lean staffing and limited funding
  • Youth and school programs use ACT to identify the myriad of sexual health services youth need and provide appropriate referrals and resources.

And finally – when it comes to adolescent sexual health:  standardization, scalability & sustainability really matter.  Building on the previous points – for providers and professionals working with youth to reduce sexual health risks ACT provides the ability to provide evidence-based, standardized counseling across a broad population, essential in today’s time-crunched, underfunded world.  For many of the organizations we work with who depend on grant-funding, ACT for Sexual Health is providing an affordable, sustainable intervention to bridge funding fluctuations.

Are you using ACT for Sexual Health?  If so, please weigh in and tell us your Sex Ed story!

Want to learn more?  Click here to schedule a call to find out more about ACT SH works in organizations like yours.

Getting to “Why?”

How boot-camp took us back to the future.

Our team recently went through a strategic planning “boot-camp” as part of a grant requirement.  A mandatory part of the exercise was justifying our value…what do we bring to the table, how do we help?

This was definitely a test.   Our short answers, in rapid succession:

  • “Because 75% of serious illness and death in youth is preventable…”
  • “Because nearly half of all youth who commit suicide visited a healthcare provider within the previous month…”
  • “Umm…because it’s the right thing to do?”

We were pushed further: “What is in it for your users – the healthcare provider, the professional working with youth?  How are you helping them?”

Ahhh – there it was, the lightbulb moment!

Preventing avoidable illness and death in youth is our mission – it’s the reason why we do what we do.  It’s the same mission that drives most of us in this work.

But making it as easy as possible for providers and professionals, to identify and counsel youth on the risky behaviors that drive our mission…making it painless…THAT is the reason behind WHY we’ve created every single solution and service we offer.

It’s the reason why RAAPS was created in the first place.  It was our first “tool”. RAAPS was developed to solve all of the workflow and practice management issues that get in the way of your mission:

  • Validated, short-format. Why? Your time is short – RAAPS has been proven to identify the most significant risks – in minutes.
  • Why? To ensure every youth is screened the same way – with the same questions – every time.
  • Tablet / smartphone delivery. Why? Youth engage honestly with technology – you don’t have to “ask” all of the questions – instead you can use your time to follow up on the risks identified.
  • Prioritized, evidence-based talking points. Why?  To make it easier to get the conversation started specific to the risks identified – we all have different experience and comfort levels with risk topics.

Yes, we could go on…  but back to boot-camp.  It was a great experience – if for no other reason than it reminded us of why we continue to develop our technology… facilitate the adolescent-focused MI trainings… write the books…. Why we got started and where we are going into the future – as we achieve our mission together with all of you!

Complimentary RAAPS Webinar: Protecting Sexually Active Teens Requires More Than a Trojan

Many teens are sexually active – and being sexually active is a well-established risk factor (particularly among younger adolescents).  But how do you know which sexually active youth are more – or most – at risk within your population?

Please join us for a complimentary webinar on Wednesday, May 14, at 3pm ET,  where we will review the latest data on factors that put sexually active adolescents at greater risk (and why); and how professionals can identify these risks to provide meaningful counseling and resources in their day-to-day practice.

This presentation will include insights into:

  • – Specific health disparities and risk factors impacting adolescent sexual health
  • – The inter-relationship between sexual health and other (seemingly unrelated) risk factors
  • – Current evidence-based recommendations and strategies for working with sexually active teens
  • – New data from the RAAPS Sexual Health Assessment system
  • – And an interactive Q&A session to address any specific questions you may have!

Click here to register for the Sexually Active Adolescents webinar on May 14, 3pm ET.