Tag: sexual health

Sex Ed 101: Here’s what we’ve learned so far…

The last year and a half has been very eventful here at P4C – we launched RAAPS 2.0 with a complete platform upgrade…  AND we released our first new product since our company was founded: the Adolescent Counseling Technology or “ACT” for Sexual Health (and our release of ACT for Tobacco is just around the corner).

With over a year of youth completing ACT for Sexual Health – we took a moment to analyze the data and reflect on what we’ve learned so far.  We were shaken at some of the findings and wanted to share them with you!

Our first ‘schooling’ came in the data.  We expected higher rates of risk among sexually active youth – but the levels are honestly staggering (and disquieting).

Among sexually active youth who were assessed and counseled by the ACT for Sexual Health system:

  • 19% have been in an abusive relationship in the last 12 months and 16% report being forced to participate in unwanted sexual activity
  • Nearly 1 in 4 (23%) had a partner who refused to use condoms or prevented the youth from using birth control
  • And 16% of youth report having bartered sex (for a place to stay, phone, alcohol or drugs, money or something else) – this number was much higher than any of us involved in the research and development of ACT had anticipated – and a growing trend that should be on the radar of all providers and professionals working with youth.

Schooling number two?  ACT solves different problems depending on the setting. We reached out to the providers and professionals using ACT – ranging from experienced sexual health gurus to novices and newbies.  We were interested in finding out the different ways organizations are using ACT SH to solve their problems related to engaging youth and supporting them in healthy decision making:

  • SBHCs are using ACT to open the door to more in-depth, in-person dialogue and counseling with sexually active youth and they are using the population-level data for reporting and to guide programming
  • Primary care and pediatric practices are using the electronic counseling to ensure sexually active youth are provided evidence-based, standardized education (a challenge in time-crunched practices where providers often have varying levels of experience and comfort levels with sex-related risk topics)
  • Health Departments are leveraging the technology to provide STI counseling and follow-up on a sustainable scale that wasn’t previously possible with lean staffing and limited funding
  • Youth and school programs use ACT to identify the myriad of sexual health services youth need and provide appropriate referrals and resources.

And finally – when it comes to adolescent sexual health:  standardization, scalability & sustainability really matter.  Building on the previous points – for providers and professionals working with youth to reduce sexual health risks ACT provides the ability to provide evidence-based, standardized counseling across a broad population, essential in today’s time-crunched, underfunded world.  For many of the organizations we work with who depend on grant-funding, ACT for Sexual Health is providing an affordable, sustainable intervention to bridge funding fluctuations.

Are you using ACT for Sexual Health?  If so, please weigh in and tell us your Sex Ed story!

Want to learn more?  Click here to schedule a call to find out more about ACT SH works in organizations like yours.

Top 5 Reasons to Invest in Adolescent Health

Global investments in adolescent health harvests significant economic gains

Recently headlines broke across all consumer and health media outlets that signified the importance of investing in teen health from a global financial perspective. Like any other professional who is in the landscape of improving adolescent health, this kind of global attention and correlation between teen health and the economy gets me excited!

The news referenced a study that highlighted a small investment in “empowering and protecting the world’s 1 billion adolescents can bring a 10-fold return.” Here’s what it said:

“Improving the physical, mental and sexual health of kids aged 10 to 19 – at a cost equivalent to US$4.60 per person per year – could result in a 10-fold economic return by preventing 12 million deaths and more than 30 million unwanted pregnancies.”

I can think of 1,000 reasons to invest in adolescent health, but here are my top 5:

  1. With fewer teens giving birth each year, a country’s young dependent population grows smaller in relation to the working-age population, creating a window of opportunity for rapid economic growth.
  2. Keeping teens safe and encouraging them to make smart decisions can help to break the spread of poverty and disadvantage across generations.
  3. The rapid physical, cognitive and psychosocial growth and development that takes place during adolescence influences an individual for the rest of his or her life.
  4. In three out of four cases of serious injury or death in adolescents, the common causes are preventable. Support in healthy decision-making will help set a pattern of healthy lifestyles and reduce morbidity, disability and premature mortality later in adulthood.
  5. This generation of adolescents will transform all our futures!

How you can take action!

  • The key to improving adolescent health is operating from a prevention mentality versus a crisis approach. Investing in a risk identification assessment tool will address the early onset of behaviors that can grow to be potentially harmful. Plus, RAAPS, a globally-recognized, evidence-based, standardized risk screening and behavior change counseling tool can pay for itself with the proper reimbursement codes.
  • When it comes to talking with teens about sexual health, things can get awkward. That’s why we developed ACT Sexual Health, a virtual health educator where teens respond to assessment questions on a tablet or other technology device and receive sexual health education specifically tailored to them. Upon completion, ACT generates a personalized safer sex action plan, health messages and customized referral sources.
  • Risk behaviors account for the majority of teen injury and premature death. In the face of these challenges, health professionals and parents need concrete, actionable strategies for productive discussions about risky behaviors. Teen Speak is a how-to guide for real talks with teens to foster strong relationships and trust-building during the most formative time in their lives.

Talking Sex with Teens: Community Health Centers ACT for Change

Today’s adolescents are engaging in risky sexual behaviors at earlier ages than ever before, resulting in nearly 250,000 teen births in 2014 and nearly 10 million new sexually transmitted infections annually. Sexually transmitted infections are a significant public health problem in the United States and of particular concern in the adolescent and young adult population. A big factor contributing to the spike is that often times, teens are reluctant to discuss their sexual health with their care team since information about sexual health related behaviors and risk factors has the potential to appear in care summaries, patient portals, insurance explanation of benefits and the like—all which adolescent and young adult patients worry can be viewed by parents and guardians. The lack of communication results in an increased risk for undiagnosed and untreated STIs, missed opportunities for behavioral health interventions, including guidance on managing risk and addressing social determinants of health, and increased disease burden in the community.

In order to improve sexual health screening and behavioral counseling in primary care, Possibilities for Change teamed up with the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC), the Health Center Network of New York (HCNNY), and four participating health centers across New Jersey and New York for a pilot project using the ACT Sexual Health System.

With today’s earlier onset of sexual activity comes an increased incidence of high-risk behaviors such as:

  • Early sexual intercourse (before the age of 13 years)
  • Multiple sexual partners (history of 4 or more lifetime partners)
  • Inconsistent condom and contraceptive use
  • Drug or alcohol use prior to sex

Research suggests that several key factors have a significant influence on sexual decision-making including: substance use prior to sex, depression and low self-esteem, homelessness, school failure, sexting, and history of abuse and dating violence. Our nation’s public health institutions have recognized the need to improve adolescent health care in the United States and are calling attention to this important issue. The Institute of Medicine (IOM), National Research Council, Pediatric Health 2011 Report concluded that “improving health outcomes for adolescents is essential to achieving a healthy future for the nation.”

In 2014, the Journal of the American Medical Association published a study that reported one-third of all adolescent health maintenance exams were completed without any discussion of sexual health. For those providers who did introduce the subject, an average of 36 seconds was spent discussing sexual health. It was concluded that strategies need to be utilized to engage adolescents in open discussions around sexuality, promoting healthy sexual development and decision-making:

  • Prioritize adolescent sexual health and ensure that all adolescents are screened and counseled on their risk behaviors using standardized, validated tools – according to nationally-recognized guidelines;
  • Become educated and aware of the inter-relationship between adolescent sexual health, high risk behaviors, and other population disparities;
  • Participate in continuing education on effective adolescent counseling strategies that will actively engage youth in the behavior change process (such as Motivational Interviewing);
  • Develop policies and processes to ensure adolescent engagement and comfort with disclosure of sexual feelings, behaviors and experiences; and
  • Address necessary workflow modifications to ensure risk screening and behavioral counseling is consistently incorporated.

To learn more about the disparities and behaviors that contribute most to sexual risk and how primary care practices and school-based health centers can meet the needs of adolescents to positively impact their sexual health, download and view the recorded webinar.

How do you talk to adolescents about safe sex decisions? Share your experiences in the comments below!

36 seconds.

According to a JAMA Pediatrics study, that’s how long the average conversation lasted when teens were asked about sexual health during their last annual health maintenance exam. Even more disappointing, the topic was not discussed with 1 out of 3 teens.

I could continue on with more data that supports the adverse reality, but I think it’s time to pause and evaluate. As health care professionals, we have the responsibility to educate, equip and inform our young people when it comes to their sexual health. We play a critical role in further reducing teen pregnancy rates and STIs through the care we provide to adolescent patients.

That’s where our newly developed technology comes in. Launched in February and funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, ACT for Sexual Health was created to provide a safe environment for teens to disclose risky sexual behaviors that will translate into a proactive plan for reproductive health and safer sex—with an end goal of reducing individual STI and pregnancy risk.

The self-paced module engages teens with interactive, evidence-based risk behavior assessment and counseling to gather honest data. The ACT works either independently or with the RAAPS assessment, and provides youth with technology-based behavior counseling, education, behavior change strategies, and a risk-reduction plan tailored to the youth’s stage of change.

One of our favorite product characteristics is the ongoing dialogue. To provide support between visits, an online portal and text messaging option is available to help keep teens on the right track.

ACT for Sexual Health will develop a comprehensive sexual health history, identifying risky behaviors such as:

  • Early onset of sexual activity
  • Multiple sexual partners
  • Not using a condom during last intercourse
  • Not using contraceptives
  • Using drugs or alcohol prior to sex

What are you waiting for? Let’s talk about sex! Click here to read more information about ACT for Sexual Health or schedule a free 20-minute demo.

 

OAH Tier Grants

If you are applying for OAH Tier 1A and/or 1B Grant Funding, partner with Possibilities for Change to enhance your proposal.  We will work with you to provide an online platform to assess your target population for risky behaviors, support risk reduction counseling efforts, track your referrals and performance, and showcase your outcomes!

Possibilities for Change offers the Rapid Assessment for Adolescent Preventive Services – Sexual Health (RAAPS-SH) standardized screening and counseling system, developed especially for sexually active adolescents. 

RAAPS-SH identifies the inter-related factors contributing most to STI and unplanned pregnancy through a teen-friendly technology based assessment; supports professionals providing risk reduction counseling and referrals; and provides comprehensive reporting to identify needs, subpopulations of risk, and behavior change over time.

RAAPS-SH Screening and Counseling System provides data to answer the tough questions:

  • -Who are the youth engaging most in unsafe sexual practices (recent sex, multiple partners, drug and alcohol use prior to sex, no condom use)?  Use this data to target youth for participation in your TPP program.
    .
  • – What are the rates of condom use, and use of other birth control options in your targeted population? Use this data to highlight outcomes of behavior change post intervention.
    .
  • – What additional risk behaviors are impacting teen’s sexual health decisions (depression, academic performance, violence). Use this data to implement support services and develop referral relationships in the community.
    .
  • – How many teens received referrals for sexual health services, followed up with the referrals and received needed resources.  Customize, track and monitor referral progress on an individual and population level.

Contact us today to find out more: info@raaps.org